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Web Design Mistakes

  1. Garish Colours

I would like to think that web developers have learned a lot about colour theory in the past 20 years, and for the most part, they have. The use of complimentary colours, often subtle or pastel hues that help add a visual flair to a design is now the norm.

Then there’s websites that think colour is the most important aspect of a website, more so than content. These websites then go and shove it in your face. Websites with bright red or garish green layouts. These websites are a visual nightmare and no web design expert would make these choices, so we can only hope they are caused by pushy clients.

  1. Too Many Fonts

The right choice of font can do a lot for a piece of text. It can be presented in a professional manner (Arial), perhaps with more character (Papyrus) or it can be cartoony to appeal to children (Comic Sans), whilst Sans Serif fonts are theoretically easier to read on-screens.

With all these possibilities it can be difficult to know which to choose. And what if you want a different meaning for each piece of text on-screen? Why, use 30 different fonts of course!

No. Do not do that. I was using sarcasm to illustrate a point. Too many fonts on-screen can be confusing to see as each style is fighting for attention. The text itself loses any flow it has as your eyes jump from font to font, rather than focusing on the content itself.

  1. Music

Music on websites is one of the most memorable aspects of websites from the early 2000s. MySpace was the most prominent of the offenders, with the ability to add your own song to your profile. The idea was to help give visitors an idea of who you are and what your personality is.

People did this for years, despite knowing that any time they went onto someone else’s profile, the first thing they did was turn off whatever awful music was playing. Adding music to your web page is distracting and anything you choose is unlikely to appeal to every (or any) visitor you get. Most importantly, however, is that it changes the users first thought from:

“What a lovely website. What should I look at first?” into

“How on earth do I turn this dreadful music of?”

That is known as “Starting off on the wrong foot”.